How often do you need to change coolant parts in your generator?

When it comes to the use of a generator, one thing you need to do is make sure you change the coolant. The coolant system is a vital part of a diesel generator. In order to make sure that the engine coolant is effective in anti-corrosion and cooling, you should replace the coolant and clear the cooling system every two years or every 2,000 hours – whichever comes first. The correct maintenance will ensure that your generator runs as smoothly as possible. So, with that being said, continue reading to discover everything you need to know.

Every generator set manufacturer provides different options when it comes to cooling system design. The two most commonly used cooling system styles are open-loop and closed-loop systems. A closed-loop system will incorporated radiator(s), a cooling fan, and cooling pump(s) that are situated on a skid, as an all-in-one unit. Moreover, trailer and container options are offered as well. A coolant that is ethylene glycol-based will then be circulated through the components of the cooling system.

For smaller to medium-sized generator applications, a Single Pump Single Loop (SPSL) system tends to be used. Let’s take a look at how this sort of system operators. First, the engine will start, and the driving of the direct drive pump begins, with the fan clutch rotating. The coolant thermostat will then open once the engine gets to operating temperature, with the fan clutch engaging now. The engine block is then supplied with ethylene glycol, as well as the intercooler, oil cooler, and other cylinder head internal components. Air will then be pulled through the radiator and the return coolant flow is directed to the radiator.

Now, let’s take a look at how the Double Pump Double Loop (DPLP) system works. This is more common with generators that are big in size and that are situated in high ambient temperature atmosphere. With this sort of generator, the engine will start, and the driving of the direct drive pump begins, with the fan clutch rotating. The coolant thermostat will then open once the engine gets to operating temperature, with the fan clutch engaging now. One pump will route ethylene glycol coolant to the cylinder head and engine block. The other pump will route the ethylene glycol coolant to the intercooler, oil cooler, and other internal components. Air will then be pulled through the radiator, with the return coolant flow being directed to the individual radiators.

So there you have it: everything that you need to know about changing the coolant for your generator and how often you need to do so. As mentioned, you need to make sure you replace the coolant and clear the cooling system every two years or every 2,000 hours. This is imperative when it comes to the efficient and effective running of the generator. If you have any questions or you need any help when it comes to your generator, all you need to do is give us a call at CPS Power UK for more information.

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